How to write and deliver a best man's speech

It's often the most awaited of the wedding speeches and unless you're used to the odd bit of public speaking, making a best man's speech can be nerve wracking to say the least. 

Here are some worthwhile things to remember before delivering some important words to your best mate's nearest and dearest. 

Don't feel the pressure to be funny
Don't feel the pressure to be funny

1 Stay sober

It sounds silly but it's definitely worth remembering. Alcohol often flows at a wedding and while a little Dutch courage may be tempting it might not end well. Best to leave any heavy drinking until your deed is done.

2 Don't begin until it's quiet

The bride and groom, the wedding party and their guests will all want to hear this speech, they will have been looking forward to it (no pressure!).

Don't begin until it's quiet and you have every one's attention and don't be afraid to hush people politely before you begin.

3 Introduce yourself

The bride and groom and their closest friends may know who you are but not every guest will.

You perhaps know the groom the best, be sure to share his good qualities
You perhaps know the groom the best, be sure to share his good qualities

Introduce yourself and share a story or some history on how you know or met the groom and your current relationship with him. 

4 Remember your thank yous

While being funny, cracking the odd joke and generally being an all round entertaining fellow might be the aim of the game, manners are important too.

Thank the happy couple for having given you the job - a compliment in the bride's direction wouldn't go amiss either.

5 Avoid sensitive stories

While stories about ex-girlfriends, old rugby tours and previous escapades may be tempting don't feel the pressure to take down your best friend.

It's important to remember the bride and all her family will be all ears on your speech
It's important to remember the bride and all her family will be all ears on your speech

It might gain a few laughs among some but making the groom, or particularly his bride, feel hugely uncomfortable or embarrassed is not actually what's required.

6 Find a heart warming story 

You're painting a picture of the groom - particularly for the bride's parents and their friends and family.

Now is your chance to say what a great guy he is and why they're so lucky he is joining their family.

7 Have a structure 

A chronological tale will help you move through the speech. Don't tell a tale from university and then move back to your school days.

Go from A to B and people will follow you with ease.

8 Try not to read straight from a sheet 

Giving a speech, getting it right, being funny - it can be a lot to remember.

But watching someone read from a script can be awkward for an audience and make it hard for them to warm to you. Lots of practice before the day in remembering your words from just small pointers is the way forward.

9 Don't be crude

There are likely to be grandparents there. And aunts, uncles, old friends, elderly relatives and of course two sets of parents.

If you're not sure, just play it safe.

Being asked to be best man is a huge honour.
Being asked to be best man is a huge honour.

10 It's ok to improvise!

You know the groom better than most people in the room.

Speak from the heart and don't be afraid to develop a story or add something else in if you feel the situation arises.

Something meaningful and heartfelt will be best received.

Close This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.Learn More